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Government releases regulations around Jan 1 foreign buyer ban

Government releases regulations around Jan 1 foreign buyer ban


The government released the regulations supporting the federal foreign buyer ban today, defining what the ban will look like.


These regulations outline:

  • The definition of a residential property, foreign buyer, and purchase;
  • Exceptions for temporary residents that meet specific obligations that include students or workers, refugees, and accredited members of foreign missions in Canada; and
  • Penalties for non-compliance applicable to Non-Canadians, as well as any person or entity knowingly assisting a Non-Canadian in violating the prohibition

There’s still little information on how this law and its regulations will be interpreted and enforced.
 

Reducing risk for REALTORS®


The regulations don’t require any further record keeping for Realtors, however the Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) recommends members perform due diligence to ensure they’re not facilitating a sale to a foreign buyer.


CREA developed the Certification and Consent of Purchaser as a way Realtors can help mitigate their risk – though members should be aware that this document may not be foolproof as there’s still little information on how the regulations will be enforced.


The certificate should be completed before assisting or advising a potential buyer and should be used in combination with other due diligence practices.


Reducing risk for REALTORS®


  • The Prohibition on the Purchase of Residential Property by Non-Canadians Act prevents non-Canadians from buying residential property in Canada for two years starting on January 1, 2023.
  • Non-Canadians are defined as individuals who aren’t:
    • Canadian citizens
    • permanent residents of Canada
    • persons registered under the Indian Act.
    • corporations based in Canada that are privately held, not listed on a stock exchange in Canada, and controlled by someone who is a non-Canadian.
  • The act defines residential property as buildings with three homes or less, as well as parts of buildings like a semi-detached house or a condominium unit. The law doesn’t prohibit the purchase of larger buildings with multiple units.
  • The act has a $10,000 fine for any non-Canadian or anyone who knowingly assists a non-Canadian and is convicted of violating the act. If a court finds that a non-Canadian has done this, they may order the sale of the house.

 

More information


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Interprovincial migration and affordability will put upward pressure on home prices in these Canadian cities next year

Contrary to Canada’s large urban centres, major cities in Alberta and Atlantic Canada are expected to see home price growth in 2023.

In its annual Market Survey Forecast, Royal LePage predicts that the aggregate price of a home in Canada will decrease 1.0% year-over-year to $765,171 in the fourth quarter of 2023, with five of the major regions surveyed expected to see aggregate price declines. The four regions where prices are forecast to increase – Calgary, Edmonton, Ottawa and Halifax – are among the more affordable cities in Canada, and have proven to be top destinations for Canadians seeking more affordable housing options.

Enabled by remote working opportunities during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond, the number of buyers relocating out of the major urban centres has accelerated over the last two years. Now faced with higher borrowing costs and living expenses, it is expected that buyer hopefuls from Ontario and British Columbia will continue to seek out affordable housing options in cities like Calgary, Edmonton and Halifax. Price growth in Calgary, Ottawa and Halifax in the fourth quarter of 2023 is expected to be led by the more affordable condominium segment. Ottawa, with its healthy employment market, relatively affordable housing and continued positive net migration, is also expected to see positive price appreciation next year.

Calgary

“Unlike Canada’s major urban centres, which saw steep increases during the pandemic boom followed by rapid declines over the last six months, the Calgary market has experienced less drastic swings,” said Corinne Lyall, broker and owner, Royal LePage Benchmark. “I expect we will continue to see moderate price growth in the entry-level market, particularly in the condominium segment.”

Edmonton

“Many buyers from outside of Alberta and elsewhere in the province continue to enter the city’s housing market. Since the beginning of February, demand has been strong from Ontario and British Columbia buyers looking to relocate to Edmonton, due to its relative affordability and healthy job market,” said Tom Shearer, broker and owner, Royal LePage Noralta Real Estate.

Halifax

“While real estate activity in 2023 is unlikely to reach the exuberant levels recorded in the first half of this year, Halifax’s population continues to grow and attract buyers from across Canada and abroad. I anticipate that we will see a return to more normal seasonal trends next year,” said Matt Honsberger, broker and owner, Royal LePage Atlantic.

Ottawa

“Condominiums will likely see greater price appreciation than other property types, as higher borrowing costs will continue to limit buyers’ purchasing power and push them to the lower end of the market,” said John Rogan, broker of record, Royal LePage Performance Realty. “Local housing activity has been largely motivated by buyers and sellers who are forced to move, including those relocating for work.”

For additional information on all nine of Canada’s major markets, read more here.

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Design of the Tax-Free First Home Savings Account

Backgrounder

In Budget 2022, the government proposed the introduction of the Tax-Free First Home Savings Account (FHSA). This new registered plan would give prospective first-time home buyers the ability to save $40,000 on a tax-free basis. Like a Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP), contributions would be tax-deductible, and withdrawals to purchase a first home—including from investment income—would be non-taxable, like a Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA).

Budget 2022 announced the key design features of the FHSA, including an $8,000 annual contribution limit in addition to a $40,000 lifetime contribution limit. Today, the Department of Finance is releasing for public comment draft legislative proposals that provide additional details on the design of the FHSA. This backgrounder offers a summary of these details.

The government expects that Canadians will be able to open and contribute to an FHSA at some point in 2023. No matter when this happens in 2023, Canadians would be allowed to contribute the full $8,000 annual limit in that year. 

Opening and Closing Accounts 

To open an FHSA, an individual must be a resident of Canada and at least 18 years of age. In addition, an individual must be a first-time home buyer, meaning that they have not owned a home in which they lived at any time during the part of the calendar year before the account is opened or at any time in the preceding four calendar years. For this purpose, ownership is defined broadly and includes beneficial ownership, but excludes a right to acquire less than 10% of a qualifying home.

An FHSA of an individual would cease to be an FHSA, and the individual would not be permitted to open an FHSA, after December 31 the year in which the earliest of these events occurs:

  • The fifteenth anniversary of the individual first opening an FHSA; or
  • The individual turns 71 years old.

Any savings not used to purchase a qualifying home could be transferred on a tax-free basis into an RRSP or Registered Retirement Income Fund (RRIF) or would otherwise have to be withdrawn on a taxable basis. Individuals that make a qualifying withdrawal could transfer any unwithdrawn savings on a tax-free basis to an RRSP or RRIF until December 31 of the year following the year of their first qualifying withdrawal.

Qualified Investments

An FHSA would be permitted to hold the same qualified investments that are currently allowed to be held in a TFSA. In particular, taxpayers would be able to hold a broad range of investments, including mutual funds, publicly traded securities, government and corporate bonds, and guaranteed investment certificates.

The prohibited investment rules and non-qualified investment rules applicable to other registered plans would apply, including the potential tax consequences described below. These rules are intended to disallow investments in entities with which the account holder does not deal at arm's length, as well as investments in certain assets such as land, shares of private corporations and general partnership units.

Contributions

The lifetime limit on contributions would be $40,000, with an annual contribution limit of $8,000. In other words, individuals would be subject to the lesser of their annual limit and remaining lifetime limit. The full annual limit would be available starting in 2023.

The annual contribution limit would apply to contributions made within a particular calendar year. Individuals would be able to claim an income tax deduction for contributions made in a particular taxation year. Unlike RRSPs, contributions made within the first 60 days of a given calendar year could not be attributed to the previous tax year.

An individual would be allowed to carry forward unused portions of their annual contribution limit up to a maximum of $8,000. This means that an individual contributing less than $8,000 in a given year could contribute the unused amount (i.e., $8,000 less their contribution in that year) in a subsequent year on top of their annual contribution limit of $8,000 (subject to their lifetime contribution limit). For example, an individual contributing $5,000 to an FHSA in 2023 would be allowed to contribute $11,000 in 2024 (i.e., $8,000 plus the remaining $3,000 from 2023). Carry-forward amounts would only start accumulating after an individual opens an FHSA for the first time.

An individual would be permitted to hold more than one FHSA, but the total amount that an individual contributes to all of their FHSAs could not exceed their annual and lifetime contribution limits. Taxpayers would generally be responsible for ensuring they do not exceed their limit in a given year. The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) would provide basic FHSA information to support taxpayers in determining how much they can contribute in a given year. 

Contributions made to an FHSA following a qualifying withdrawal being made (i.e., when buying a first home) would not be deductible from net income.

Undeducted Contributions

An individual would not be required to claim a deduction for the tax year in which a contribution is made. Like RRSP deductions, such amounts could be carried forward indefinitely and deducted in a later tax year.

Qualifying Withdrawals

In order for an FHSA withdrawal to be a qualifying (i.e., non-taxable) withdrawal, certain conditions must be met.

First, a taxpayer must be a first-time home buyer at the time a withdrawal is made. Specifically, the taxpayer could not have owned a home in which they lived at any time during the part of the calendar year before the withdrawal is made or at any time in the preceding four calendar years. There is an exception to allow individuals to make qualifying withdrawals within 30 days of moving into their home. 

The taxpayer must also have a written agreement to buy or build a qualifying home before October 1 of the year following the year of withdrawal and intend to occupy the qualifying home as their principal place of residence within one year after buying or building it.

A qualifying home would be a housing unit located in Canada. A share in a co-operative housing corporation that entitles the taxpayer to possess, and have an equity interest in a housing unit located in Canada, would also qualify. However, a share that only provides a right to tenancy in the housing unit would not qualify.

Provided the taxpayer meets the qualifying withdrawal conditions, the entire amount of available FHSA funds may be withdrawn on a tax-free basis in a single withdrawal or a series of withdrawals.

Non-qualifying Withdrawals

Withdrawals that are not qualifying withdrawals would be included in the income of the individual making the withdrawal. Financial institutions would be required to collect and remit withholding tax on non-qualifying withdrawals, consistent with the treatment applicable to taxable RRSP withdrawals.

Non-qualifying withdrawals would not re-instate either the annual contribution limit or the lifetime contribution limit.

Transfers     

An individual could transfer funds from an FHSA to another FHSA, an RRSP or a RRIF on a tax-free basis.

Funds transferred to an RRSP or RRIF will be subject to the usual rules applicable to these accounts, including taxability upon withdrawal. These transfers would not reduce, or be limited by, an individual's available RRSP contribution room. These transfers would not reinstate an individual's FHSA lifetime contribution limit.

Individuals would also be allowed to transfer funds from an RRSP to an FHSA on a tax-free basis, subject to the FHSA annual and lifetime contribution limits and the qualified investment rules. Although such transfers would be subject to FHSA contribution limits, they would not be deductible and would also not reinstate an individual's RRSP contribution room.

Treatment of FHSA Income for Tax and Income-Tested Benefit Purposes   

Contributions to an FHSA would be deductible in computing income for tax purposes. In addition, income, losses and gains in respect of investments held within an FHSA, as well as qualifying withdrawals, would not be included (or deducted) in computing income for tax purposes or taken into account in determining eligibility for income-tested benefits or credits delivered through the income tax system (for example, the Canada Child Benefit and the Goods and Services Tax Credit).

Eligible Issuers    

Any financial institution that is able to issue RRSPs and TFSAs would be able to issue FHSAs. This includes Canadian trust companies, life insurance companies, banks and credit unions.

Interaction with the Home Buyers' Plan (HBP)

The HBP would continue to be available as under existing rules. However, an individual would not be permitted to make both an FHSA withdrawal and an HBP withdrawal in respect of the same qualifying home purchase.

Spousal Contributions and Attribution Rules

The FHSA holder would be the only taxpayer permitted to claim deductions for contributions made to their FHSA. Individuals would not be able to contribute to their spouse or common-law partner's FHSA and claim a deduction.

That said, an individual could contribute to their FHSA from funds provided to them by their spouse. Normally, if an individual transfers property to the individual's spouse or common-law partner, the income tax rules generally treat any income earned on that property as income of the individual. An exception to these "attribution rules" would allow individuals to take advantage of the FHSA contribution room available to them using funds provided by their spouse. Specifically, these attribution rules would not apply to income earned in an FHSA that is derived from such contributions.

Marital Breakdowns

On the breakdown of a marriage or a common-law partnership, it is proposed that an amount may be transferred directly from the FHSA of one party to the relationship to an FHSA, RRSP, or RRIF of the other. In such circumstances, transfers would not re-instate any contribution room of the transferor, and would not be counted against any contribution room of the transferee.

Over-contribution, Non-qualified Investment, Prohibited Investment, and Advantage Taxes

Like TFSAs, a 1% tax on over-contributions to an FHSA would apply for each month (or a part of a month) to the highest amount of such excess that exists in that month.

When a taxpayer's annual contribution limit is reset at the beginning of each calendar year, over-contributions from a previous year may cease to be an over-contribution. A taxpayer would be allowed to deduct an over-contributed amount for a given year in the tax year in which it ceases to be an over-contribution but not earlier. However, if a qualifying withdrawal is made before an over-contribution ceases to be an over-contribution, no deduction would be provided for the over-contributed amount.

Example:

Alyssa contributes $10,000 on November 15, 2023 and does not withdraw it. This contribution exceeds Alyssa's annual FHSA contribution limit by $2,000.

Alyssa would be subject to an over-contribution tax of $40 (1% × $2,000 × 2 months) when filing her 2023 tax return in 2024. The $2,000 amount would cease to be an over-contribution on January 1, 2024, as a new annual limit of $8,000 would be available.

Alyssa would be allowed to deduct $8,000 from her 2023 net income. Presuming Alyssa did not make a qualifying withdrawal between November 15, 2023 and January 1, 2024, she would be allowed to deduct the additional $2,000 from her 2024 net income.

The Income Tax Act imposes other taxes in certain circumstances involving non-qualified investments, prohibited investments, and unintended advantages in respect of other registered plans. These rules would also apply to the FHSA.

The Minister of National Revenue would have authority to cancel or waive all or part of these taxes in appropriate circumstances. Various factors would be taken into account including reasonable error, the extent to which the transactions that gave rise to the tax also gave rise to another tax, and the extent to which payments were made from the taxpayer's registered plan.

Treatment Upon Death

Like TFSAs, individuals would be permitted to designate their spouse or common-law partner as the successor account holder, in which case the account could maintain its tax-exempt status. If named as the successor holder, the surviving spouse would become the new holder of the FHSA immediately upon the death of the original holder provided the surviving spouse meets the eligibility criteria to open an FHSA (see the discussion above under "Opening and Closing Accounts"). Inheriting an FHSA in this way would not impact the surviving spouse's contribution limits. Inherited FHSAs would assume the surviving spouse's closure deadlines. If the surviving spouse is not eligible to open an FHSA, amounts in the FHSA could instead be transferred to an RRSP or RRIF of the surviving spouse, or withdrawn on a taxable basis.

If the beneficiary of an FHSA is not the deceased account holder's spouse or common-law partner, the funds would need to be withdrawn and paid to the beneficiary. Amounts paid to the beneficiary would be included in the income of the beneficiary for tax purposes. When such payments are made, the payment to the beneficiary would be subject to withholding tax.

Non-residents

Taxpayers would be allowed to contribute to their existing FHSAs after emigrating from Canada, but they would not be able to make a qualifying withdrawal as a non-resident. Specifically, a taxpayer withdrawing funds from an FHSA must be a resident of Canada at the time of withdrawal and up to the time a qualifying home is bought or built.

Withdrawals by non-residents would be subject to withholding tax.

Reporting Requirements

Opening an Account

In order to open an FHSA, a taxpayer would be required to confirm their eligibility to an eligible issuer.

Ongoing Reporting

Financial institutions would be required to send to the CRA annual information returns in respect of each FHSA that they administer. The CRA would use information provided by issuers to administer the FHSA and provide basic FHSA information to taxpayers.

Withdrawals

In order to make a qualifying withdrawal, an individual would be required to submit a request to their FHSA issuer confirming their eligibility. Issuers would not apply withholding taxes upon receiving a valid qualifying withdrawal request.

When any withdrawals are made (qualifying or non-qualifying), the FHSA issuer would be required to prepare an information slip with the amount of the withdrawal and, in the case of a non-qualifying withdrawal, any income tax withheld on that amount.

Account Closure

The CRA would issue a reminder to all taxpayers and their FHSA issuers of when an FHSA will no longer have tax-advantaged status.

Deposit Insurance Framework

The Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation insures eligible deposits up to $100,000 per member institution, per person, per category. It is proposed that the Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation Act be amended to create a new category of insured deposits for FHSAs, as is the case for RRSPs and TFSAs.

Interest Deductibility   

Like RRSPs and TFSAs, interest on money borrowed to invest in an FHSA would not be deductible in computing income for tax purposes.

Collateralization    

Taxpayers must include in income the full value of any assets held within an FHSA and pledged as collateral for a loan.

Bankruptcy

FHSAs would not be afforded creditor protection under the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act.

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Inflation, rising interest rates create caution across Metro Vancouver’s housing market

Inflation, rising interest rates create caution across Metro Vancouver’s housing market


Home sale activity across the Metro Vancouver housing market continued to trend well below historical averages in October.


The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential home sales in the region totalled 1,903 in October 2022, a 45.5 per cent decrease from the 3,494 sales recorded in October 2021, and a 12.8 per cent increase from the 1,687 homes sold in September 2022.


Last month’s sales were 33.3 per cent below the 10-year October sales average.


“Inflation and rising interest rates continue to dominate headlines, leading many buyers and sellers to assess how these factors impact their housing options,” Andrew Lis, REBGV’s director, economics and data analytics said. “With sales remaining near historic lows, the number of active listings continues to inch upward, causing home prices to recede from the record highs set in the spring of 2022.”


There were 4,033 detached, attached and apartment properties newly listed for sale on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in Metro Vancouver in October 2022. This represents a 0.4 per cent decrease compared to the 4,049 homes listed in October 2021 and a 4.6 per cent decrease compared to September 2022 when 4,229 homes were listed.


The total number of homes currently listed for sale on the MLS® system in Metro Vancouver is 9,852, a 22.6 per cent increase compared to October 2021 (8,034) and a 1.2 per cent decrease compared to September 2022 (9,971).


“Recent years have been characterized by a frenetic pace of sales amplified by scarce listings on the market to choose from. Today’s market cycle is a marked departure, with a slower pace of sales and more selection to choose from,” Lis said. “This environment provides buyers and sellers more time to conduct home inspections, strata minute reviews, and other due diligence. With the possibly of yet another rate hike by the Bank of Canada this December, it has become even more important to secure financing as early in the process as possible.”


For all property types, the sales-to-active listings ratio for October 2022 is 19.3 per cent. By property type, the ratio is 14.3 per cent for detached homes, 21.6 per cent for townhomes, and 23.2 per cent for apartments.


Generally, analysts say downward pressure on home prices occurs when the ratio dips below 12 per cent for a sustained period, while home prices often experience upward pressure when it surpasses 20 per cent over several months.


The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver is currently $1,148,900. This represents a 2.1 per cent increase from October 2021, a 9.2 per cent decrease over the last six months, and a 0.6 per cent decrease compared to September 2022.


Sales of detached homes in October 2022 reached 575, a 47.2 per cent decrease from the 1,090 detached sales recorded in October 2021. The benchmark price for detached properties is $1,892,100. This represents a 1.6 per cent increase from October 2021 and a 0.7 per cent decrease compared to September 2022.


Sales of apartment homes reached 995 in October 2022, a 44.8 per cent decrease compared to the 1,801 sales in October 2021. The benchmark price of an apartment property is $727,100. This represents a 5.1 per cent increase from October 2021 and a 0.2 per cent decrease compared to September 2022.


Attached home sales in October 2022 totalled 333, a 44.8 per cent decrease compared to the 603 sales in October 2021. The benchmark price of an attached unit is $1,043,600. This represents a 7.1 per cent increase from October 2021 and a 0.5 per cent decrease compared to September 2022.


Download the October 2022 stats package.

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Fall Porch Décor Updates
Fall is now here and it’s time to update porch décor from cheugy to chic! ✨

This year we’re thinking tonal, monochromatic elegance. These front porch decorating ideas will surely pique your interest by emphasizing the effortless aesthetic of Canadian contemporary design.

@HGTV
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Metro Vancouver saw more home sellers and fewer buyers in September

Metro Vancouver saw more home sellers and fewer buyers in September

Home sellers were more active in Metro Vancouver’s housing market in September while home buyer demand remained below the region’s long-term averages. 


The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential home sales in the region totalled 1,687 in September 2022, a 46.4 per cent decrease from the 3,149 sales recorded in September 2021, and a 9.8 per cent decrease from the 1,870 homes sold in August 2022. 


Last month’s sales were 35.7 per cent below the 10-year September sales average. 


“With the Bank of Canada and other central banks around the globe hiking rates in an effort to stamp out inflation, the cost to borrow funds has risen substantially over a short period,” said Andrew Lis, REBGV director, economics and data analytics. “This has resulted in a more challenging environment for borrowers looking to purchase a home, and home sales across the region have dropped accordingly.” 


There were 4,229 detached, attached and apartment properties newly listed for sale on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in Metro Vancouver in September 2022. This represents an 18.2 per cent decrease compared to the 5,171 homes listed in September 2021 and a 27.1 per cent increase compared to August 2022 when 3,328 homes were listed. 


The total number of homes currently listed for sale on the MLS® system in Metro Vancouver is 9,971, an eight per cent increase compared to September 2021 (9,236) and a 3.2 per cent increase compared to August 2022 (9,662). 


“With fewer homes selling and new listings continuing to come to market, inventory is beginning to accumulate, providing buyers with more selection compared to last year,” Lis said. “With more supply and less demand within this market cycle, residential home prices have edged down in the region over the last six months.” 


For all property types, the sales-to-active listings ratio for September 2022 is 16.9 per cent. By property type, the ratio is 12.4 per cent for detached homes, 18.4 per cent for townhomes, and 20.9 per cent for apartments. 


Generally, analysts say downward pressure on home prices occurs when the ratio dips below 12 per cent for a sustained period, while home prices often experience upward pressure when it surpasses 20 per cent over several months. 


The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver is currently $1,155,300. This represents a 3.9 per cent increase over September 2021, an 8.5 per cent decline over the past six months, and a 2.1 per cent decline compared to August 2022.


Sales of detached homes in September 2022 reached 525, a 44.7 per cent decrease from the 950 detached sales recorded in September 2021. The benchmark price for a detached home is $1,906,400. This represents a 3.8 per cent increase from September 2021 and a 2.4 per cent decrease compared to August 2022. 


Sales of apartment homes reached 888 in September 2022, a 45.2 per cent decrease compared to the 1,621 sales in September 2021. The benchmark price of an apartment home is $728,500. This represents a 6.2% per cent increase from September 2021 and a 1.6 per cent decrease compared to August 2022. 


Attached home sales in September 2022 totalled 274, a 52.6 per cent decrease compared to the 578 sales in September 2021. The benchmark price of an attached home is $1,048,900. This represents a 9.1 per cent increase from September 2021 and a 1.9 per cent decrease compared to August 2022. 


Download the September 2022 stats package.

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Home Buying Blog
How has the increased cost of living impacted Canadians' homebuying plans this year?

With interest rates continuing to increase and inflation reaching a decades high, younger Canadians have been especially affected.

Read our latest blog post to learn how many Canadians have been forced to deprioritize their plans to buy a home.
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Metro Vancouver home sales return to more traditional levels in April

Metro Vancouver home sales return to more traditional levels in April


Home buyer demand in Metro Vancouver* returned to more historically typical levels in April.


The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential home sales in the region totalled 3,232 in April 2022, a 34.1 per cent decrease from the 4,908 sales recorded in April 2021, and a 25.6 per cent decrease from the 4,344 homes sold in March 2022.


Last month’s sales were 1.5 per cent above the 10-year April sales average.


“So far this spring, we’ve seen home sales ease down from the record-breaking pace of the last year,” Daniel John, REBGV Chair said. “While a small sample size, the return to a more traditional pace of home sales that we’ve experienced over the last two months provides hopeful home buyers more time to make decisions, secure financing and perform other due diligence such as home inspections.”


There were 6,107 detached, attached and apartment properties newly listed for sale on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in Metro Vancouver in April 2022. This represents a 23.1 per cent decrease compared to the 7,938 homes listed in April 2021 and an 8.5 per cent decrease compared to March 2022 when 6,673 homes were listed.


The total number of homes currently listed for sale on the MLS® system in Metro Vancouver is 8,796, a 14.1 per cent decrease compared to April 2021 (10,245) and a 15.3 per cent increase compared to March 2022 (7,628).


“With interest rates climbing and the total inventory of homes for sale inching higher, it’s important to work with your local Realtor to understand how these factors could affect your home buying or selling situation,” John said. 


For all property types, the sales-to-active listings ratio for April 2022 is 36.7 per cent. By property type, the ratio is 25.3 per cent for detached homes, 47.1 per cent for townhomes, and 45 per cent for apartments.


Generally, analysts say downward pressure on home prices occurs when the ratio dips below 12 per cent for a sustained period, while home prices often experience upward pressure when it surpasses 20 per cent over several months.


The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver is currently $1,374,500. This represents an 18.9 per cent increase over April 2021 and a one per cent increase compared to March 2022.


Sales of detached homes in April 2022 reached 962, a 41.9 per cent decrease from the 1,655 detached sales recorded in April 2021. The benchmark price for a detached home is $2,139,200. This represents a 20.8 per cent increase from April 2021 and a one per cent increase compared to March 2022.


Sales of apartment homes reached 1,692 in April 2022, a 26.1 per cent decrease compared to the 2,289 sales in April 2021. The benchmark price of an apartment home is $844,700. This represents a 16 per cent increase from April 2021 and a 1.1 per cent increase compared to March 2022.


Attached home sales in April 2022 totalled 578, a 40 per cent decrease compared to the 964 sales in April 2021. The benchmark price of an attached home is $1,150,500. This represents a 25 per cent increase from April 2021 and a 1.1 per cent increase compared to March 2022.


Download the April 2022 stats package.

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Metro Vancouver home sales set a record in 2021

Metro Vancouver home sales set a record in 2021


Metro Vancouver home sales reached an all-time high in 2021 as housing needs remained a top priority for residents in the second year of the COVID-19 pandemic. 


The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential home sales in the region totalled 43,999 in 2021, a 42.2 per cent increase from the 30,944 sales recorded in 2020, a 73.6 per cent increase from the 25,351 homes sold in 2019, and a four per cent increase over the previous all-time sales record of 42,326 set in 2015. 


Last year’s sales total was 33.4 per cent above the 10-year sales average.

 
“Home has been a focus for residents throughout the pandemic. With low interest rates, increased household savings, more flexible work arrangements, and higher home prices than ever before, Metro Vancouverites, in record numbers, are assessing their housing needs and options,” Keith Stewart, REBGV economist said. 


Home listings on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in Metro Vancouver reached 62,265 in 2021. This is a 14.7 per cent increase compared to the 54,305 homes listed in 2020 and a 19.9 per cent increase compared to the 51,918 homes listed in 2019. 


Last year’s listings total was 11 per cent above the 10-year average. 


“While steady, home listing activity didn't keep pace with the record demand we saw throughout 2021. This imbalance caused residential home prices to rise over the past 12 months,” Stewart said.  


The total number of homes currently listed for sale on the MLS® system in Metro Vancouver is 5,236, a 38.7 per cent decrease compared to December 2020 (8,538) and a 26.7 per cent decrease compared to November 2021 (7,144). 


“We begin 2022 with just over 5,000 homes for sale across the region. This is the lowest level we’ve seen in more than 30 years,” Stewart said. “With demand at record levels, residents shouldn’t expect home price growth to relent until there’s a more adequate supply of housing available to purchase.” 


The MLS® HPI composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver ends the year at $1,230,200. This is a 17.3 per cent increase compared to December 2020. 


Both detached home and townhome benchmark prices increased 22 per cent in the region last year, while apartments increased 12.8 per cent. 


Looking across Metro Vancouver, Maple Ridge saw the largest increase in benchmark prices at 34.7 per cent, followed by Pitt Meadows (29.8 per cent), and Whistler (27.8 per cent). 


Looking at area and property type, detached homes in Pitt Meadows saw the largest benchmark price increase at 42.2 per cent, followed by detached homes (38.5 per cent) and townhomes (35.2 per cent) in Maple Ridge. 


December summary 


REBGV reports that residential home sales in the region totalled 2,688 in December 2021, a 13.1 per cent decrease from the 3,093 sales recorded in December 2020, and a 21.6 per cent decrease from the 3,428 homes sold in November 2021. 


Last month’s sales were 33.4 per cent above the 10-year December sales average. 


There were 1,945 detached, attached and apartment properties newly listed for sale on the MLS® in Metro Vancouver in December 2021. This represents a 19.3 per cent decrease compared to the 2,409 homes listed in December 2020 and a 50.9 per cent decrease compared to November 2021 when 3,964 homes were listed. 


For all property types, the sales-to-active listings ratio for December 2021 is 51.3 per cent. By property type, the ratio is 35.1 per cent for detached homes, 75.6 per cent for townhomes, and 60.8 per cent for apartments. 


Generally, analysts say downward pressure on home prices occurs when the ratio dips below 12 per cent for a sustained period, while home prices often experience upward pressure when it surpasses 20 per cent over several months. 


Sales of detached homes in December 2021 reached 794, a 22.6 per cent decrease from the 1,026 sales recorded in December 2020. The benchmark price for a detached home is $1,910,200. This represents a 22 per cent increase from December 2020 and a 2.1 per cent increase compared to November 2021. 


Sales of apartment homes reached 1,464 in December 2021, a 1.4 per cent decrease compared to the 1,474 sales in December 2020. The benchmark price of an apartment home is $761,800. This represents a 12.8 per cent increase from December 2020 and a 1.2 per cent increase compared to November 2021. 


Attached home sales in December 2021 totalled 430, a 29.9 per cent decrease compared to the 613 sales in December 2020. The benchmark price of an attached home is $1,004,900. This represents a 22 per cent increase from December 2020 and a 1.5 per cent increase compared to November 2021. 


Download the December 2021 stats package.

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Welcome to 3323 Hockaday Place...This lovely family home is located in a great neighbourhood on a quiet cul-d-sac. Elegant living room & dining room which share a 3 way gas fireplace. Perfect for entertaining. Tiled front entry. Lovely solid hickory flooring throughout most of main floor. Great kitchen with wood cabinets & gas stove. Breakfast bar for morning coffee. Cozy family room with gas fireplace & glass sliders that lead out to the back patio & yard. Large laundry room with lots of storage. 3 bedrooms upstairs have new carpeting. Extra large master bedroom suite. Updated ensuite with large shower + claw footed soaker tub+heated floors. Downstairs has a large games/rec room, perfect for your teens. Bedroom downstairs. Bathroom down with large shower. Tons of storage in the 4'10 crawl space. Great fenced backyard for the kids & Fido. Enjoy relaxing on your patio. Easy care tile roof & vinyl siding with brick trim. This home has had many updates through the years & has been cared for by the original owners. A pleasure to show...
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September 2018 Real Estate Stats

More supply and less demand seen across Metro Vancouver housing market

The supply of homes for sale continued to increase across the Metro Vancouver* housing market in September while home buyer demand remained below typical levels for this time of year.


The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential property sales in the region totalled 1,595 in September 2018, a 43.5 per cent decrease from the 2,821 sales recorded in September 2017, and a 17.3 per cent decrease compared to August 2018 when 1,929 homes sold.


Last month’s sales were 36.1 per cent below the 10-year September sales average.

“Fewer home sales are allowing listings to accumulate and prices to ease across the Metro Vancouver housing market,” Ashley Smith, REBGV president-elect said. “There’s more selection for home buyers to choose from today. Since spring, home listing totals have risen to levels we haven’t seen in our market in four years.”


There were 5,279 detached, attached and apartment properties newly listed for sale on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in Metro Vancouver in September 2018. This represents a 1.8 per cent decrease compared to the 5,375 homes listed in September 2017 and a 36 per cent increase compared to August 2018 when 3,881 homes were listed.


The total number of properties currently listed for sale on the MLS® system in Metro Vancouver is 13,084, a 38.2 per cent increase compared to September 2017 (9,466) and a 10.7 per cent increase compared to August 2018 (11,824).


For all property types, the sales-to-active listings ratio for September 2018 is 12.2 per cent. By property type, the ratio is 7.8 per cent for detached homes, 14 per cent for townhomes, and 17.6 per cent for condominiums.


Generally, analysts say that downward pressure on home prices occurs when the ratio dips below the 12 per cent mark for a sustained period, while home prices often experience upward pressure when it surpasses 20 per cent over several months.


“Metro Vancouver’s housing market has changed pace compared to the last few years. Our townhome and apartment markets are sitting in balanced market territory and our detached home market remains in a clear buyers’ market,” Smith said. “It’s important for both home buyers and sellers to work with their Realtor to understand what these trends means to them.”

The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver is currently $1,070,600. This represents a 2.2 per cent increase over September 2017 and a 3.1 per cent decrease over the last three months.


Sales of detached properties in September 2018 reached 508, a 40.4 per cent decrease from the 852 detached sales recorded in September 2017. The benchmark price for detached properties is $1,540,900. This represents a 4.5 per cent decrease from September 2017 and a 3.4 per cent decrease over the last three months.


Sales of apartment properties reached 812 in September 2018, a 44 per cent decrease compared to the 1,451 sales in September 2017. The benchmark price of an apartment property is $687,300. This represents a 7.4 per cent increase from September 2017 and a 3.1 per cent decrease over the last three months.


Attached property sales in September 2018 totalled 275, a 46.9 per cent decrease compared to the 518 sales in September 2017. The benchmark price of an attached unit is $837,600. This represents a 6.4 per cent increase from September 2017 and a two per cent decrease over the last three months.


Click here to download the full package.


To find out what is happening in your next of the woods, please feel free to contact us and chat.

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The data relating to real estate on this website comes in part from the MLS® Reciprocity program of either the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV), the Fraser Valley Real Estate Board (FVREB) or the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board (CADREB). Real estate listings held by participating real estate firms are marked with the MLS® logo and detailed information about the listing includes the name of the listing agent. This representation is based in whole or part on data generated by either the REBGV, the FVREB or the CADREB which assumes no responsibility for its accuracy. The materials contained on this page may not be reproduced without the express written consent of either the REBGV, the FVREB or the CADREB.