MARIE & KIM TAVERNA

Direct : 604-802-7759 |  

We couldn't be happier to announce that in 2020, the
Royal LePage Shelter Foundation
raised $2 million in support of women's shelters and domestic violence prevention! This brings our total raised to-date to $35 million! ✨
Our Royal LePage Canada family and their generous communities showed us that not even a global pandemic would get in their way of helping women and children find safety from domestic violence. ❤️
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SOLD TO VERY NICE PEOPLE


Welcome to 482 Riverview Crescent, Coquitlam BC


This beautiful family home is move in ready. Elegant living with gas fireplace with surrounding built-ins & dining room with built-in china cabinets+over looking manicured back yard & multi deck levels. Summertime bbq’s.


Updated gourmet kitchen with bright white cabinets/stone counters/shining stainless steel appliances/gas cook top/wall oven, etc.


Principle bedroom with walk-in closet+3-piece ensuite. Great size 2nd & 3rd bedrooms. Updated main bath.


Cozy family room with gas fireplace/built-ins+glass sliders to yard. Large rec room & surrounding rooms would make a great revenue suite.


Loads of storage over the garage. Workshop. Newer furnace & air conditioning.


Central location with shopping+transit nearby. Too many features to mention.



Offer for sale at $1,400,000.00 

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Highlights:

  • A house in Ontario’s and Atlantic Canada’s recreational property markets expected to see highest price gains in 2021, rising 17%; Quebec and British Columbia recreational markets forecast to increase 15% and 13%, respectively
  • 91% of recreational experts in Canada reporting lower inventory than typical for respective regions as demand continues to outpace supply
  • 46% of recreational experts reporting an increase in inter-provincial migration, as many Canadians choose cottage country over cityscapes as the backdrop to their home offices

 March 23, 2021 – According to Royal LePage, the aggregate price of a house in Canada’s recreational regions is forecast to increase 15 per cent in 2021 to $502,730, as demand continues to rapidly outpace inventory. The company revised its 2021 recreational property forecast, released in November 2020, upward to reflect the increasing unmet demand from potential buyers who are actively looking for properties.


“From coast to coast, the line between primary residence and recreational property is blurring,” said Phil Soper, president and CEO, Royal LePage. “The trend began last summer when the option of traveling abroad was taken away, and continued to gain popularity as it became clear that with access to high speed internet, many people can do their jobs from just about anywhere.”


The aggregate price of a house in Canada’s recreational property regions increased 16.0 per cent year-over-year to $437,156 in 2020 compared to 2019. During the same period, the aggregate price of a waterfront property increased 9.8 per cent to $813,385 and the aggregate price of a condominium rose 10.5 per cent to $310,257.


Houses in the recreational regions of Ontario and Atlantic Canada are forecast to see the highest price appreciation in the country this year, set to increase 17 per cent, while prices in Quebec and British Columbia are forecast to increase 15 per cent and 13 per cent, respectively. According to a survey[1] of 190 Royal LePage recreational real estate professionals across the country, 91 per cent said that their market has less inventory than typical for their respective regions, including 72 per cent that reported significantly less inventory available.


In many areas, supply shortages are forcing buyers into multiple-offer situations, which often result in properties selling above the asking price. In Ontario, 87 per cent of recreational real estate professionals said that more than half of properties available on the market are selling above the asking price. In Quebec and British Columbia, 65 and 52 per cent respectively reported the same.


“The low inventory, high demand scenario that is defining Canada’s current real estate landscape can be frustrating for buyers and their agents,” continued Soper. “Without enough supply to meet demand, prices continue to increase at above normal rates. And with so few listings to choose from, owners are concerned they will have nowhere to go if they sell before buying, so they hesitate to list. This cycle makes it difficult for anyone to move ahead.


“Life during the pandemic has made cottage country and country living more desirable than ever, in every part of Canada. The flexibility provided by working remotely, excess savings from months sitting at home, and low interest rates have left Canadians young and old alike to seek properties with more space, easy access to nature, and the ability to achieve that ever-elusive work-life balance. And, an increasing number of new owners intend to use these escapes for both weekend play and Monday to Friday work.”


Royal LePage real estate professionals in Western and Atlantic Canada have reported an increase in out-of-province buyers over the past year. All experts in the recreational regions of the Maritimes and more than two-thirds (68%) of those in British Columbia reported seeing a boost in inter-provincial migration this year.


The younger generation is a very active segment of buyers. A recent Royal LePage survey released last month[2] on real estate trends among Canadians aged 25 to 35 found that when given the choice, 47 per cent said they would choose small town or country living, while 45 per cent said they’d prefer to live in a city. Nearly two-thirds of Canadians in this age group (63%), who are employed or seeking employment, say the ability to work for an employer that allows the option of remote work is important. Fifty-two per cent said the availability of remote work has increased their likelihood to move further from their current or future place of work. Overall, 39 per cent of this cohort are considering a move from their current home to a less dense area as a result of the pandemic, while 46 per cent said the pandemic had no impact on their desire to move to a less dense area.


“According to our research, access to high speed internet and the ability to work remotely are among the top criteria for those seeking properties in Canada’s recreational regions, followed closely by four-season usability,” said Soper. “There is no doubt the pandemic has had an impact on our lifestyle, but also our mindset. The more time Canadians spend in their homes, the more apparent their needs and priorities become.”


Royal LePage 2021 Spring Recreational Property Price Forecast and 2020 Price Data Chart (national and regional): rlp.ca/table_2021springrecreationalpropertyreport


British Columbia

The aggregate price of a house in British Columbia’s recreational regions is forecast to increase 13 per cent in 2021 to $781,918. In 2020, the aggregate price of a house in the province’s recreational markets increased 12.9 per cent year-over-year to $691,963 compared to 2019. During the same period, the aggregate price of a waterfront property increased 2.7 per cent to $1,784,872, while the aggregate price of a condominium increased 3.9 per cent to $340,812.

According to a Royal LePage survey of recreational property experts, 68 per cent of respondents in British Columbia reported an increase in the number of buyers from other provinces, compared to previous years. Forty per cent of experts in the region representing buyers reported that their clients are making four to seven offers on average before transacting.

Meanwhile, 40 per cent of those working primarily with sellers say that their clients’ properties are receiving four to seven offers on average. Eighty-eight per cent of regional experts reported a significant decrease in inventory in B.C.’s recreational property market compared to what is typical for their respective regions.

“Our biggest challenge right now is extremely low inventory and increased buyer demand,” said Francis Braam, broker, Royal LePage Kelowna. “I expect we’ll see double digit price gains in Central Okanagan this spring. Canadians will be spending another summer at home, further propelling their interest in the recreational property market.”


In Whistler and Pemberton, remote work and low borrowing costs remain a driving force behind increasing prices.

“I am anticipating a brisk spring market with lots of activity,” said Frank Ingham, associate broker, Royal LePage Sussex. “We should see a boost in supply, although it still won’t be enough to satisfy demand at the rate it is increasing. Every buyer has their own motivation, but overwhelmingly Canadians are shifting their mindset and their priorities. They want more space and more fresh air, with access to nature and wildlife.”


According to the Royal LePage 2021 Demographic Survey released last month, 35 per cent of those aged 25 to 35 in the province of British Columbia say the pandemic has increased their desire to move to a less dense area, and 63 per cent say it is important to work for an employer that allows them to work remotely.


Royal LePage 2021 Spring Recreational Property Price Forecast and 2020 Price Data Chart (national and regional): rlp.ca/table_2021springrecreationalpropertyreport


About the Royal LePage Recreational Property Report


The Royal LePage Recreational Property Report compiles insights, data and forecasts from 51 markets. Median price data was compiled and analyzed by Royal LePage for the period between January 1, 2020 and December 31, 2020 and January 1, 2019 and December 31, 2019. Data was sourced through local brokerages and boards in each of the surveyed regions. Royal LePage’s aggregate home price is based on a weighted model using median prices. Data availability is based on a transactional threshold and whether regional data is available using the report’s standard housing types. Aggregate prices may change from previous reports due to an increase in the number of participating regions.





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I have listed a new property at 482 RIVERVIEW CRES in Coquitlam.
Welcome to 482 Riverview Way in East Coquitlam. This beautiful family home is move in ready. Elegant living with gas fireplace with surrounding built-ins & dining room with built-in china cabinets + they look out to the manicured back yard & multi deck levels. Summertime bbq’s. Updated gourmet kitchen with bright white cabinet/stone counters/shining stainless steel appliances/gas cook top/wall oven/built-in microwave. Principle bedroom with walk-in closet + 3-piece ensuite. Great size 2nd & 3rd bedrooms. Updated main bath. Warm & cozy family room with gas fireplace/built ins + glass sliders to yard. Large rec room would make a great studio suite /home office / games room or teen hangout. Bring your ideas for this room. Loads of storage over the garage. Workshop. Newer furnace & air conditioning. Fabulous central location, minutes away from shopping, transit & so much more. Too many features to mention. This home is a pleasure to show & owners pride shows through.
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I have listed a new property at 1006 3070 GUILDFORD WAY in Coquitlam.
Welcome to Lakeside Terrace. This is condo lifestyle at it is best. With stunning views of the mountains, Town Centre park and the beautiful lagoon below. Located on the 10th floor, this two bedroom / two bathroom home is located in the centre of some of the best Coquitlam has to offer. Large windows let the natural light shine in, even on a cloudy day. Living room with gas fireplace to keep you warm on a cool night. Kitchen with white cabinets. Insuite laundry. Large principal bedroom with mirrored closets doors. Second bedroom could make a great home office space. Watch the sun come up or enjoy a warm summer dinner on the balcony and watch the clouds go by. A short stroll to restaurants & eateries/Skytrain & buses/shopping/library/aquatic centre and so much more. Enjoy walking at Town Centre Park.
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Welcome to 482 Riverview Crescent in East Coquitlam.

This beautiful family home is move in ready.


Elegant living with gas fireplace with surrounding built-ins & dining room with built-in china cabinets+over looking manicured back yard & multi deck levels. Summertime bbq’s.


Updated gourmet kitchen with bright white cabinet/stone counters/shining stainless steel appliances/gas cook top/wall oven/built-in microwave.


Principle bedroom with walk-in closet+3-piece ensuite. Great size 2nd & 3rd bedrooms. Updated main bath.


Cozy family room with gas fireplace/built-ins+glass sliders to yard.


Large rec room. Bring your ideas for this room.


Loads of storage over the garage. Workshop. Newer furnace & air conditioning.


Fabulous central location with shopping, transit nearby.


Too many features to mention.


http://share.jumptools.com/studioSlideshow.do?collateralId=223747&t=2918&b=1

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The Right Fit

 
 
 

Home may be where the heart is, but it's also where you and your family need to comfortably fit. If you're trying to decide between a single-family home and a condo for your next move, you'll want to weigh the various configurations.

Houses: Houses come in a myriad of formations, from single-story bungalows to multi-floor mansions. A detached house is a complete unit on its own where you own both the building and the land it's on. A semi-detached house shares a wall with another house, but is otherwise its own complete unit. Townhouses also fall into the single-family home category, and while they can have the space and indoor layout of a detached or semi-detached house, they're attached either on the sides or vertically with the other townhouses in the complex.

There are two types of townhouses — freeholds, where the owner owns both the house and the land it's built on, and condominium townhouses, where the owners own a percentage of the condo corporation versus any actual land. Similar to an apartment condominium, condo townhouse owners pay a monthly maintenance fee to cover water, sewage, garbage and shared amenity expenses.

Condominiums: A condominium can refer to one unit within one building, or a series of buildings on a piece of land. It is governed by an elected body that makes decisions pertaining to building regulations, maintenance and concerns that affect unit owners and residents. The difference between an apartment and a condo unit is that with apartments, each unit in the building is owned by one entity and then rented out to tenants. With a condo, an individual owns their particular unit, which can then be either occupied by the owner or in some cases, rented out.

Let's sit down and review your current needs, wants and budget, as well as your future lifestyle requirements in order to find the type of housing that provides just the right fit.

 
   
 
   
 
 

4 Steps to Contractor Success

 
 
 

Planning a major home renovation? Consider the human element throughout the project to ensure as smooth an experience as possible between you and your service professionals.

  1. Communicate! Even after you've submitted professional drawings and plans for your renovation, sit down with your contractor to verify exactly what you envision. Photographs you've ripped out of magazines and images you've captured from the internet will speak volumes when shared with your renovator. Make sure both big and small renovation dreams are specified in writing so you can discuss them with your contractor, have them priced out, and finalize both your vision and your financial commitment up-front.

  2. Clear the way! Move and remove any furniture or other items in the path to the project, so workers can easily access the space.

  3. Be a good host. Even though the workers aren't at your home for a social event, they will always appreciate some homey hospitality; the offer of fresh coffee, bottled water and even the occasional treat is always welcomed!

  4. Make yourself scarce. Once you've clarified the project details and timing each day, you'll want to step out of the work zone so the workers can get their job done safely and efficiently. Keep your cell phone by your side, of course, to answer any questions throughout the day.

With open communication and mutual trust, both you and your contractor can move forward with your home renovation quickly, effectively and successfully.

 
   
 
   
 
 

Home Safe Home

 
 
 

When the clocks "sprung forward" in most Canadian provinces this month, many homeowners used the occasion as a prompt to change the batteries in their smoke detectors. If you haven't yet changed your batteries, consider this your reminder to do so now!

It's important for every home to include basic safety equipment. Take a few minutes to review what you have, and what you need.

Smoke detectors. Each floor in your home should have a smoke detector. They're easy to maintain — simply test them monthly to ensure they continue to function properly, and change batteries twice a year.

Carbon monoxide detectors. While most times you're able to see and smell smoke in your home, carbon monoxide can sneak in undetected. It's a colourless, odourless gas, making it especially dangerous. Sources of carbon monoxide in the home can include water heaters, furnaces or boilers, gas stoves and ovens, and fireplaces, both gas and wood burning. Install your carbon monoxide alarms on every floor, five feet from the ground, for the best reading of your home's air.

Fire extinguishers. Should you ever experience a sudden burst of fire while cooking, you'll be thankful to have a functioning fire extinguisher to quickly and safely quash your culinary catastrophe.

Even if your own home is fully equipped with safety equipment, consider a fire extinguisher, smoke detector or a carbon monoxide detector for your next house-warming gift!

 
   

 
 


 

 
 
     
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52% say remote work has increased likelihood of moving further from employer 

Highlights:

  • 68% of non-homeowners aged 25 to 35 intend to purchase a home within five years
  • 72% of cohort feels confident in their short-term financial outlook
  • 40% of cohort saw their savings grow since mid-March
  • Royal LePage survey includes national, regional and city-level insights

According to a recent Royal LePage demographic survey[1], nearly half (48%) of Canadians aged 25 to 35 currently own their home, and 25 per cent of these homeowners purchased a property during the pandemic. Among non-homeowners, there is a strong intention to purchase in the future (84%), with 68 per cent planning to make the move in the next five years. Sixteen per cent say they plan to purchase a property within the year, while 14 per cent say they will buy within one to two years, and 39 per cent are looking to purchase in two to five years.


“The pandemic provided an unexpected prize for young Canadians — a path to home ownership,” said Phil Soper, president and CEO, Royal LePage. “Mortgage rates fell to historically low levels and the competition for entry-level housing lessened. Many investors sought to divest of property as traditional renter groups such as foreign students, new immigrants and short-term renters disappeared behind closed borders.”


Soper noted that much higher than typical demand from this cohort, combined with older homeowners who have been generally more reluctant to put their property on the market during the pandemic, has contributed to a near-crisis shortage of listings in parts of the country.


“Measures necessary to prevent the spread of COVID-19 have motivated many of our younger Canadians to buy, while the health crisis dissuaded many of our older homeowners from selling,” continued Soper. “Some young people living with parents or roommates found their work-from-home environment uncomfortably crowded. Others saw a once-in-a-decade affordability window open on their dream of home ownership. On the other hand, many older homeowners whose homes are adequate for changed employment circumstances have delayed their desire for a housing upgrade until the medical crisis is under control.”


Confidence in Canadian real estate is strong and despite economic challenges related to the pandemic, Canadians aged 25 to 35 have a healthy personal financial outlook. Ninety-two per cent of those surveyed agree that owning a home is a good financial investment. Seventy-two per cent are confident in their short-term financial outlook and 78 per cent are confident in their long-term financial future. Many (40%) have even seen their savings grow since the onset of the pandemic, and 11 per cent saw a significant increase.


“In many ways, the pandemic has sucked the joy out of our normally kinetic young adults’ lives. No dining out, no concerts with friends or winter escapes to the sunny south. Even retail therapy has lost its luster when no one will see those new shoes on the next Zoom call. The silver lining is in soaring savings; unspent money that is finding its way into real estate investments,” said Soper.


Nearly two thirds of Canadians in this age group (63%), who are employed or seeking employment, say the ability to work for an employer that allows the option of remote work is important, a fact that is not surprising given the volume of sales in regions outside of the major urban centres since the onset of the pandemic. Fifty-two per cent said the availability of remote work has increased their likelihood to move further from their current or future place of work. Overall, 39 per cent of this age group are considering a move from their current home to a less dense area as a result of the pandemic, while 46 per cent said the pandemic had no impact on their desire to move to a less dense area.


When given the choice, 45 per cent of those aged 25 to 35 said they’d prefer to live in a city. Similarly, 47 per cent said they would choose small town or country living. The top responses for the most attractive feature of living in a city are walkability (21%) and access to events, attractions and other entertainment options (21%), followed by diversity of people and cultures (18%), and more employment opportunities (17%). The top reasons for wanting to move to a less dense area are access to more outdoor space (62%) and lower home prices (61%), followed by the affordability of larger properties (51%).


Experts across the country noted young buyers felt comfortable with the safety measures in place around the home buying process during the pandemic.


“Younger buyers are exceedingly comfortable with online research, be it for the latest personal tech, a pair of running shoes, or a home,” said Soper. “This group has had no problem adapting to our enhanced use of virtual tours and electronic contracts. We expect the pandemic will have permanently accelerated the acceptance among our clients of using many of our emerging home buying and selling technologies.”

Royal LePage 2021 Demographic Survey (full national, regional and city-level results): rlp.ca/table_2021demographicsurvey



British Columbia

In British Columbia, 49 per cent of residents aged 25 to 35 own their home. Of those homeowners, 27 per cent purchased a home since mid-March of last year. Among those who do not currently own a home, 65 per cent say they intend to buy within the next five years.


Strong demand from buyers aged 25 to 35 continues to drive sales in Western Canada. As is the case from coast to coast, many young Canadians in British Columbia (41%) have seen their savings grow since the onset of the pandemic, which has been an important factor in their decision to purchase a home during this time, along with historically low interest rates.


Low interest rates are oxygen for the market. Younger buyers have a positive association with home ownership. They see the value in it and they’ve done the math. Currently, a monthly mortgage payment can equate to little more than renting.”


Ninety-one percent of those surveyed in the province believe that home ownership is a good investment. It been  noted that clients in this age group are thinking more long-term, and low interest rates have made it possible for them to purchase a larger starter home.


Over the last year, we have noticed a shift in priorities where first-time buyers are increasingly valuing size and outdoor space over location.


Seventy-one per cent and 72 per cent of those surveyed in B.C. feel confident in their short-term and long-term personal financial outlook, respectively. They expects activity among this cohort to remain high this spring and throughout the coming year.


Royal LePage 2021 Demographic Survey (full national, regional and city-level results): rlp.ca/table_2021demographicsurvey

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March 2, 2021

Home buyer competition intensifies across Metro Vancouver’s housing market


Competition amongst home buyers is putting upward pressure on home prices across Metro Vancouver’s* housing market. 


The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential home sales in the region totalled 3,727 in February 2021, a 73.3 per cent increase from the 2,150 sales recorded in February 2020, and a 56 per cent increase from the 2,389 homes sold in January 2021. 


Last month’s sales were 42.8 per cent above the 10-year February sales average. 


“Metro Vancouver’s housing market is experiencing seller’s market conditions. The supply of listings for sale isn’t keeping up with the demand we’re seeing,” Colette Gerber, REBGV Chair said. “Competition amongst home buyers is causing multiple offer situations and upward pressure on prices.


“This is particularly true in the townhome market where demand is outstripping the available supply. Conditions differ depending on location and property type so it’s important to work with your local REALTOR® to develop strategies to meet your needs.” 


There were 5,048 detached, attached and apartment homes newly listed for sale on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in Metro Vancouver in February 2021. This represents a 26.1 per cent increase compared to the 4,002 homes listed in February 2020 and a 12.7 per cent increase compared to January 2021 when 4,480 homes were listed. 


The total number of homes currently listed for sale on the MLS® system in Metro Vancouver is 8,358, a 9.1 per cent decrease compared to February 2020 (9,195) and a 0.6 per cent increase compared to January 2021 (8,306). This is 21.2 per cent below the February 10-year average for new listings. 


For all property types, the sales-to-active listings ratio for February 2021 is 44.6 per cent. By property type, the ratio is 41.8 per cent for detached homes, 61.8 per cent for townhomes, and 41.7 per cent for apartments. 


Generally, analysts say downward pressure on home prices occurs when the ratio dips below 12 per cent for a sustained period, while home prices often experience upward pressure when it surpasses 20 per cent over several months. 


“Low interest rates remain a key driver in today’s market. We’re seeing steady numbers of first-time home buyers and move-up buyers entering the market,” Gerber said. 


The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver is currently $1,084,000. This represents a 6.8 per cent increase over February 2020 and a 2.6 per cent increase compared to January 2021. 


Less populated communities within the region continue to experience the largest year-over-year price increases across all property types. Examples, according to the MLS HPI®. include Bowen Island (34.4 per cent increase), the Sunshine Coast (32.7 per cent increase), West Vancouver (16.1 per cent increase) Maple Ridge (14.8 per cent increase) and Ladner (13.7 per cent increase). 


Sales of detached homes in Metro Vancouver reached 1,231 in February 2021, a 79.7 per cent increase from the 685 detached sales recorded in February 2020. The benchmark price for a detached home is $1,621,200. This represents a 13.7 per cent increase from February 2020 and a 2.8 per cent increase compared to January 2021.


Sales of apartment homes reached 1,759 in February 2021, a 65.8 per cent increase compared to the 1,061 sales in February 2020. The benchmark price of an apartment is $697,500. This represents a 2.5 per cent increase from February 2020 and a 2.5 per cent increase compared to January 2021. 


Attached home sales in February 2021 totalled 737, an 82.4 per cent increase compared to the 404 sales in February 2020. The benchmark price of an attached home is $839,800. This represents a 7.2 per cent increase from February 2020 and a 2.9 per cent increase compared to January 2021. 


Download the February 2021 stats package

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Welcome to Lakeside Terrace. This is condo lifestyle at it is best. With stunning views of the mountains, Town Centre park & the beautiful lagoon below. Located on the 10th floor, this 2 bedroom/2 bathroom home is located in the centre of some of the best Coquitlam has to offer. Large windows let the natural light shine in, even on a cloudy day. Living room with gas fireplace to keep you warm on cool nights. Kitchen with white cabinets. Insuite laundry. Large principal bedroom with mirrored closets doors. Second bedroom could make a great home office space. Watch the sun come up or enjoy a warm summer dinner on the balcony & watch the clouds go by. A short stroll to restaurants & eateries/Skytrain & buses/shopping/library/aquatic centre & so much more. Enjoy walking at Town Centre Park.
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The data relating to real estate on this website comes in part from the MLS® Reciprocity program of either the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV), the Fraser Valley Real Estate Board (FVREB) or the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board (CADREB). Real estate listings held by participating real estate firms are marked with the MLS® logo and detailed information about the listing includes the name of the listing agent. This representation is based in whole or part on data generated by either the REBGV, the FVREB or the CADREB which assumes no responsibility for its accuracy. The materials contained on this page may not be reproduced without the express written consent of either the REBGV, the FVREB or the CADREB.