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Key highlights from the national release include:

  • The Royal LePage National House Price Composite, compiled from proprietary property data in 63 of the nation's largest real estate markets, showed that the price of a home in Canada increased 6.2 per cent year-over-year to $605,512 in the first quarter of 2018. 

  • At the outset of the quarter, sales activity levels fell at both national and regional levels year-over-year, in part due to an observed "pull-ahead" in transactions at the end of 2017, as buyers sought to solidify home purchases before the new mortgage rules came into effect. 

  • Greater Vancouver witnessed the most significant condominium price gains among Canada's major metropolitan areas, posting a 19.8 per cent increase to a median price of $668,342. In the GTA, the median price of a condominium increased 11.9 per cent year-over-year to $471,854 in the first quarter, and decreased slightly on a quarter-over-quarter basis, decreasing 1.3 per cent. Bucking this trend, condominiums in the Greater Montreal Area appreciated 3.5 per cent to $314,554 year-over-year compared to two-storey homes, which appreciated 8.3 per cent to $492,751. 

  • Beginning in the first quarter of 2018, seven real estate markets were added to the Royal LePage National House Price Composite. The new regions are: Abbotsford (BC), Burlington (ON), Guelph (ON), Barrie (ON), Thunder Bay (ON), Saguenay (QC) and Fort McMurray (AB).

 

  • British Columbia was a leading Canadian economic powerhouse in 2017, but its growth is expected to slow over the next two years as measures to curb the housing market set in. However, in turn, fewer home listings are expected to put continued upward pressure on prices. The province’s unemployment rate was 4.7 per cent in March, well below the national average. Furthermore, B.C. is one of the few provinces that is adding population via three core channels: natural increase, international immigrants, as well as through interprovincial in-migration, further supporting housing demand in the region.

 

  • In the first quarter of 2018, the aggregate price of a home in Greater Vancouver rose 10.3 per cent year-over-year to $1,280,014, while the City of Vancouver saw an increase of 10.1 per cent to $1,487,048. Meanwhile, surrounding suburbs continued to see relatively high year-over-year appreciation as a result of increasing demand for lower-priced properties outside the city center. During the same period, Langley, Surrey, Coquitlam and Burnaby posted home price increases of 18.5 per cent, 16.3 per cent, 15.3 per cent and 11.7 per cent to an aggregate price of $933,725, $879,848, $1,088,334 and $1,132,570, respectively.

 

 

  • About the Royal LePage House Price Survey

    The Royal LePage House Price Survey provides information on the three most common types of housing in Canada, in 63 of the nation’s largest real estate markets. Housing values in the House Price Survey are based on the Royal LePage National House Price Composite, produced quarterly through the use of company data in addition to data and analytics from its sister company, RPS Real Property Solutions, the trusted source for residential real estate intelligence and analytics in Canada.  Commentary on housing and forecast values are provided by Royal LePage residential real estate experts, based on their opinions and market knowledge.

  • Reprinted with permission.

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BCREA ECONOMICS NOW

 

Canadian Housing Starts - April 2018

 

Canadian housing starts fell 3 per cent on a monthly basis in march to 225,213 units at a seasonally adjusted annual rate (SAAR).  The six-month trend in Canadian housing starts was steady at about 226,000 units SAAR.

In BC, total housing starts jumped 48 per cent on a monthly basis to 46,629 units SAAR with multiple unit starts rising over 60 per cent. On a year-over-year basis, total starts in the province were 4 per cent higher. 

Looking at census metropolitan areas (CMA) in BC: 

 

  • Total starts in the Vancouver CMA were up 60 per cent on a monthly basis after falling close to 40 per cent in February. Year-over-year, Vancouver starts were up 6 per cent. The 32,000 unit annual pace set in March was the result of an increase in both condo and rental units in core parts of the Metro area including the City of Vancouver, Richmond and North Vancouver.

 

  • In the Victoria CMA, housing starts were down 5 per cent on a monthly basis but were almost double the level of March 2017 due to a surge of new multi-unit starts. Apartment starts were 77 per cent higher than March last year while single detached starts were down 32 per cent.

  • In the Kelowna CMA, new home construction bounced back from a slow February with total housing starting rising by over 4 times the previous months activity.  However, starts were down 68 per cent compared to what was a very busy March of 2017.

 

  • Housing starts in the Abbotsford-Mission CMA  increased 71 per cent on a monthly basis but were down 20 per cent year-over-year, largely due to lower single detached starts. Multiple unit starts were essentially flat compared to last year.

    The British Columbia Real Estate Association (BCREA) is the professional association for more than 20,000 REALTORS® in BC, focusing on provincial issues that impact real estate. Working with the province’s 11 real estate boards, BCREA provides continuing professional education, advocacy, economic research and standard forms to help REALTORS® provide value for their clients.

     “Copyright British Columbia Real Estate Association. Reprinted with permission.”

     

 

 

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April 4th, 2018

 

Home buyers and sellers were less active in Metro Vancouver throughout the first quarter of 2018.

 

 

The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential home sales in the region totalled 2,517 in March 2018, a 29.7 per cent decrease from the 3,579 sales recorded in March 2017, and a 14 per cent increase compared to February 2018 when 2,207 homes sold.

 

 

Last month’s sales were 23 per cent below the 10-year March sales average.

 

 

There were 6,542 home sales on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in Metro Vancouver during the first quarter of 2018, a 13.1 per cent decrease from the 7,527 sales over the same period last year. This represents the region’s lowest first-quarter sales total since 2013.

 

 

“We saw less demand from buyers and fewer homes listed for sale in our region in the first quarter of the year,” Phil Moore, REBGV president said. “High prices, new tax announcements, rising interest rates, and stricter mortgage requirements are among the factors affecting home buyer and seller activity today.”

 

 

There were 4,450 detached, attached and apartment properties newly listed for sale in Metro Vancouver in March 2018. This represents a 6.6 per cent decrease compared to the 4,762 homes listed in March 2017 and a 5.4 per cent increase compared to February 2018 when 4,223 homes were listed.

 

 

There were 12,469 homes listed for sale in Metro Vancouver during the first quarter of 2018, a 0.8 per cent decrease from the 12,568 sales over the same period last year. This represents the region’s lowest first-quarter new listings total since 2013.

 

 

The total number of homes currently listed for sale on the MLS® system in Metro Vancouver is 8,380, a 10.5 per cent increase compared to March 2017 (7,586) and a 7.1 per cent increase compared to February 2018 (7,822).

 

 

“Even with lower demand, upward pressure on prices will continue as long as the supply of homes for sale remains low,” Moore said. “Last month was the quietest March for new home listings since 2009 and the total inventory, particularly in the condo and townhome segments, of homes for sale remains well below historical norms.”

 

 

For all property types, the sales-to-active listings ratio for March 2018 is 30 per cent. By property type, the ratio is 14.2 per cent for detached homes, 39.9 per cent for townhomes, and 61.6 per cent for condominiums.

 

 

Generally, analysts say that downward pressure on home prices occurs when the ratio dips below the 12 per cent mark for a sustained period, while home prices often experience upward pressure when it surpasses 20 per cent over several months.

 

 

The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver is currently $1,084,000. This represents a 16.1 per cent increase over March 2017 and a 1.1 per cent increase compared to February 2018.

 

 

Sales of detached properties in March 2018 reached 722, a decrease of 37 per cent from the 1,150 detached sales recorded in March 2017. The benchmark price for detached properties is $1,608,500. This represents a 7.4 per cent increase from March 2017 and a 0.4 per cent increase compared to February 2018.

 

 

Sales of apartment properties reached 1,349 in March 2018, a decrease of 26.7 per cent compared to the 1,841 sales in March 2017. The benchmark price of an apartment property is $693,500. This represents a 26.2 per cent increase from March 2017 and a 1.6 per cent increase compared to February 2018.

 

 

Attached property sales in March 2018 totalled 446, a decrease of 24.1 per cent compared to the 588 sales in March 2017. The benchmark price of an attached unit is $835,300. This represents a 17.7 per cent increase from March 2017 and a two per cent increase compared to February 2018.

 

 

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The data relating to real estate on this website comes in part from the MLS® Reciprocity program of either the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV), the Fraser Valley Real Estate Board (FVREB) or the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board (CADREB). Real estate listings held by participating real estate firms are marked with the MLS® logo and detailed information about the listing includes the name of the listing agent. This representation is based in whole or part on data generated by either the REBGV, the FVREB or the CADREB which assumes no responsibility for its accuracy. The materials contained on this page may not be reproduced without the express written consent of either the REBGV, the FVREB or the CADREB.